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#1 14-05-04 01:27:13

Darren
Guest

Automatic car?

I have now had 3 lessons (6 hours) in a manual car. My clutch control is good according to the instructor. The main problem i have is coming to junctions and crossroads. I always stop and apply the handbrake to get the bite, then release the handbrake and drive on. My instructor told me i could fail my test by doing this.

For the last few weeks ive been concidering buying an automatic car as my 1st car, and i probably wouldnt go near a manual car atall. Whats your advise on this?

Should i continue in a manual, or just go for automatic, as im not going to own a manual.

And if i did need to have a manual licence, i would get a few lessons on the basics of clutch control, and resit my test.

I feel like a pillock even contemplating this option, but i think i would be more confident going on to main roads, junctions, crossroads, etc.... with an automatic rather than a manual.

i would really appreaciate your advise

thanks :oops:  8)  lol

14-05-04 01:27:13

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Re: Automatic car?



#2 14-05-04 06:49:44

DAVE-ADI
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

The question you should be asking is why your instructor is allowing you to apply the handbrake every time, rather than practising holding the car at biting point.  He says your clutch control is good, yet you cannot hold the car at bite?  That is a contradiction.

You need to practice the teqnique somewhere quiet on a hill, so that it is not too important if you roll back a little, until you perfect it.     
Ask your instructor to concentrate on this for a couple of lessons.   

If you are still having problems then you can consider automatics.  But gaining a munual licence gives you more options (and skills) for the future.

#3 14-05-04 07:19:22

Bob_FOADS
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

Holding the car on the bite after just 6 hours can be rather dificult. The DSA state that the average person needs around 40 hours tuition.
One of the biggest mistakes for this type of thing is braking to a stop. Once you have stopped with your foot on the brake it is impossible to get the biting point as you foot should be on the gas but is on the brake.

At a steep up hill junction...
1 slow down in whatever gear your in to a quick running speed.
2 Take you foot off of the brake
3 change to first gear
(by now the hill should hve slowed you down to a waking speed)
4 Gass on, find the bite
5 DO NOT TOUCH THE BRAKE AGAIN!
(your instructor should be covering his brake to assist if the car rolls back too far)
6 If you start to roll back lift the clutch a littlle (1 mm NO MORE)
7 if you go fowards depress the clutch a millimetere NO MORE
8 repeat 6 and / or 7 untill you are at the junction and still

This all needs to be done a fair way from the junction, if you stop too early all you need to do is lift the clutch a mm and you'll creep up to it then repet step 7. If you do it too late you'll go over the junction and then it's too late, you'll have to brake to a halt and do the handbrake thing.

As for the Auto, if you have no intention of EVER driving a manual why did you start taking lessons in one? I always recomend manual as it covers autos but if you never intend using a manual then you may well find it quicker / easier to go auto. Obviously in the long run if you decide to go manual you'll need to spend more cash and time in the long run.

#4 14-05-04 09:06:54

keslo66
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

hi there. my driving instructor is telling me to apply the handbreak and get the biting point if i know that i willbe moving soon. so does this mean that in the test i will be failed for it? please let me know as i thought i would get failed aswell but he said otherwise
thanks
luv steph

#5 14-05-04 09:41:48

Bob_FOADS
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

Hi keslo66.

OK, to clear up a few things that are dificult to generlise.

You shouldn't have a problem with getting into first, applying the handbrake, find the bite and drop the handbrake when it's safe to go.

Out there on the road there are an almost infinate amout of different situations all of which requre a slightly different approch.

lets assume you come up to a very open junction that you can see is clear from a considerable distance. If you stop, put on the handbrake, select first, find the biting point, look both ways then go you may well be marked for hesitancy as there was no need to stop at all.

However, come up to the same junction and it is obviously busy and you wont be going out for a while (I use the rule of thumb that if you're stopped for 3 secs or more) then the handbrake use is correct.

In simple terms at any junction take it at an 'approprite speed' this may be as much as 60mph (very rare but I'm making a point) or as slow as 'stoped' for more than a few seconds so safest with the handbrake on.

There are so many variations on the theme and all answers on this fourm can only cover general situations so please do listen to your instructor for the specifics. If your instructor dosen't explain them well keep asking for more detail till you get an answer you understand. Do bear in mind that the exact same junction may require very different approches depending on the traffic. If all that fails, try a different instructor.

As a final note, your instructor shouldn't say 'you'd fail if you did that'. If you force them to with questions like 'would I have faild for driving across thta persons lawn?' then they should answer truthfully but I for one HATE that question or ones like it.
All in all, don't worry about passing or failing the test, just try to drive smoothly. You'll be paying the examiner to check your driving so let him/her do their job that you've payed them to do whilst you concentrate on a smooth comfortable drive.


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#6 14-05-04 12:16:13

Darren
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

Bob_FOADS wrote:

As for the Auto, if you have no intention of EVER driving a manual why did you start taking lessons in one?

The reason i started taking them in a manual was because i didnt know how "tricky" it is and how complicated it is to do. Personally, im not going to drive a manual car. Am i right in thinking, if i have an automatic licence i can drive: automatic, semi automatic, tiptronic and paddle shift? as they have no manual clutch.

And yeah, my driving instructor said

You will fail your test if you keep applying the handbrake to find the bite

#7 21-05-04 13:59:31

kitty falol
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

Yep, I'm pretty sure that you can drive anything without a clutch.

I have a chronic back condition, so I'm learning in an automatic car.  I tried the manual 10 years ago and the automatic is just so much more relaxing to drive and you concentrate more on what is going on.  That's not to say it's any easier to pass though!

As for buying a car, you'll find that even a slightly older automatic car can often be £500  more expensive than it's manual counterpart.  You also need to consider whether it's a CVT or stepped gear change.  I was told that the CVT gear box is only good for 50 to 70,000 miles and costs £1000s to replace.  I bought a little 8 year old Micra (which is a dream to drive!) It does have a CVT gear box but it only has 9,000 miles on the clock, so it will last me a long time yet.

I'm no car expert by any stretch of the imagination, but I believe that a CVT gear box will remain stationery when you take your foot off the break and will roll backwards on a hill, while a stepped gear box automatic will creep forward, but remain stationary if you are parked on a hill with your foot off the brake.  The CVT is a smoother ride, but the stepped gear box can often feel a little safer - especially in an uphill queue to get into the car park!

As for feeling a pillock, just remember that more executive type cars are automatic, than any other price range......

#8 27-05-04 17:14:02

sallyb
Guest

Re: Automatic car?

Go for an automatic...I've done an intensive course in a manual, failed the test, then swapped to our auto during the LONG wait till the re-test. I'm much happier driving the auto, although I didn'r fail for any related to clutch control, as it removes one major item from the "must get right" list.
ps I am driving a semi-auto with gear stick and paddles and the DSA have confimred that its ok for auto test.

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