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#1 08-04-14 18:14:52

christinerobs
Member
Registered: 19-08-13
Posts: 35

How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

Been an ADI for over 1 year and looking at options like fleet training how do I get to be a fleet trainer and get involved in fleet work? I live near leeds

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08-04-14 18:14:52

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Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?



#2 08-04-14 19:43:44

daz6215
Verified Member
Registered: 07-06-08
Posts: 449

Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

Look at doing an accredited fleet trainers course, be careful which one you choose. Some companies like AADrivetech insist that you complete an induction which can also include an add on to become accredited. Brush up on your presentation skills and subject knowledge and look at maybe acquiring other licence categories if you dont already have them to help you stand out from the rest. If you dont already have RoSPA GOLD look at acquiring too!

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#3 08-04-14 20:04:06

ralge
Verified Member
From: Sheffield
Registered: 10-01-07
Posts: 320

Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

Others may think you are jumping the gun having only been an ADI for a year.
Well, if you really want to do it, get stuck in - I got both my ADI and fleet badges within 5 months back in 2004.  I just knew that's what I wanted to do.
The DVSA website gave details of DSA-accredited fleet-instructor training companies and, not surprisingly, of the 3-part testing regime - I found mine via this list.  I personally would be very wary of free fleet trainer training that has been made available through some Govt funding for a customer-service qualification and, necessarily, diluted. I'd encourage you to work in a course to become more expert in driving, in defensive and Advanced instruction than in customer service.  After all, as a fleet trainer you can expect sometimes to sit with a driver with Advanced driving knowledge and expertise - more than a few retired traffic cops end up work as fleet driver assessors and their new employers expect you to be able to deal with them as equals, as a minimum.  You can't, in these circumstances, be seen as deficient in knowledge, technique or ability.

Then, after qualification, there's the small matter of what fleet work you can expect to get.
I'm not so sure that my ways into getting fleet work (phone, write, push at doors, badger) would work as well now as they did for me over the last 9-10 years.  I write that since none of the fleet training companies I have worked for have recruited too many new (as in "inexperienced") trainers recently (or for that matter, in the last few years).  Maybe as the country comes more convincingly out of recession and companies start to spend money on training ... who knows?
It is also the case that more than a few of these companies ask for qualifications over and above a fleet badge (RoSPA Gold/Diploma, for instance).  A truck or bus entitlement opens more doors than a plain, bog-standard car licence with no vocational entitlements gained via the DVSA (as distinct from via grandfather rights).
Many fleet-registered trainers report having done very little fleet work even though they have phoned, written and pushed at the same doors that I did.  Happily (for a few of us) these training companies stay reasonably loyal to the list of trainers that they use - in that way they can quality assure the trainer base and give a small-ish number of trainers a reasonable amount of work (and command their loyalty to a degree in response).

Getting fleet work independently of the national training companies is notoriously hit-and-miss.  You may be able to exploit your local business contacts for a lucrative contract or two but you then have to manage your office-time to locate and win the next contract.  My own customers are blissfully unaware of my fleet badge and have no understanding of what extra training I have gone through - so, if you have your own customers lined up and you have the expertise, there's no logical need for you to have a fleet badge.

I hope this background information helps.

Last edited by ralge (08-04-14 20:10:39)


DSA Fleet Trainer, RoSPA Dip, PTLLS, Safed for Vans, NDAC/Speed Awareness on-road trainer, RoSPA RoAD Test Examiner.

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#4 17-08-14 11:03:12

ratty
Member
Registered: 05-02-11
Posts: 466

Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

I know this is (more than slightly) off topic but I have a question for ralge.

I see you are a RoSPA RoAD Test Examiner, how many of these have you actually done?

I thought that RoAD Test died a death the day after it was thought of, have you done many?

Thanks

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#5 18-08-14 04:20:38

ralge
Verified Member
From: Sheffield
Registered: 10-01-07
Posts: 320

Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

Without checking my records I wouldn't know exactly.  I would guess at a personal tally of between 30 and 40 (both training up for it and examining).
Not my most regular work but "every little counts"!

Last edited by ralge (18-08-14 04:53:40)


DSA Fleet Trainer, RoSPA Dip, PTLLS, Safed for Vans, NDAC/Speed Awareness on-road trainer, RoSPA RoAD Test Examiner.

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#6 18-08-14 06:25:13

ratty
Member
Registered: 05-02-11
Posts: 466

Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

That surprises me.

I remember doing a course about, I think 2007, just after it came out, then nothing until a few weeks ago when I was asked to do an HGV course.

I had thought that it hadn't caught on and disappeared years ago.

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#7 28-08-14 16:05:03

ratty
Member
Registered: 05-02-11
Posts: 466

Re: How do I get to be a fleet trainer?

Well this is just like waiting for a bus!

You wait for a long time then a few come along together. I've been asked to do more of these courses.

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